New Research: Yoga and Cholesterol

By Jennifer Morganti, ND, NEEDS Director of Education

If you have ever tried yoga, you already know how wonderfully de-stressing and energizing it can be. But what you may not have realized is that it can also help lower cholesterol! A recent small study was conducted in India to determine if a consistent yoga program could help address high cholesterol. Twenty-two women who took thyroid medication for hypothyroidism participated in this study. All had high cholesterol—a common symptom related to low thyroid—high TSH, low thyroid, and all took prescription thyroid medication.

In this study, the women participated in intense yoga practice for one hour daily for six months. The yoga sessions included sun salutations, meditation, breathing practices, and a variety of yoga postures. After practicing for six months, it was shown that their total cholesterol and triglycerides decreased significantly, and their HDL (beneficial cholesterol) increased significantly. There were only slight improvements in thyroid issues; TSH levels decreased slightly, but not significantly, and seven of the twenty-two women were able to lower their thyroid medication doses.

High cholesterol can lead to atherosclerosis or “clogged arteries,” putting a person at risk for coronary artery disease, stroke, and heart attack. Statin drugs are commonly prescribed to reduce cholesterol levels, but they come with risk for other side effects, such as muscle pain, liver damage, and neurological effects. So it makes sense to try alternative, natural treatments to lower cholesterol as an initial trial. It would be wise to take red yeast rice, fish oil, and milk thistle to lower cholesterol levels, along with healthy eating and a consistent yoga practice.

This small but interesting study indicates that long term yoga practice may be part of an effective plan for reducing stress, balancing thyroid hormones, and reducing risk of cardiovascular disease.

July 27, 2016 at 5:13 pm Leave a comment

Why Whey?

By Jennifer Morganti, ND, NEEDS Director of Education

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) estimate that almost 10 percent of the U.S. population has Type-2 diabetes, and over one third of U.S. cases go undiagnosed. Diabetes is the seventh-leading cause of death and because of a large aging population, statistics are expected to continue to increase steadily.

People with diabetes have high blood-sugar levels (hyperglycemia) caused by insulin resistance or insulin deficiency. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas and acts like a taxi that shuttles glucose (sugar) from the blood into the cells, where it is either stored or made into energy (ATP).

Insulin resistance occurs when there is plenty of glucose in the blood, but the cells block insulin from entering and refuse delivery of glucose. In diabetes, there isn’t enough insulin, usually because of pancreas dysfunction due to the constant stress of producing more and more insulin.

There are two types of diabetes, Type-1 and Type-2. Type-2 is by far the most prevalent type, yet it is highly preventable and treatable through lifestyle modifications. Type-2 was once called “adult-onset diabetes,” but that term has faded over the past decade because it is now showing up increasingly in younger people. Type-2 diabetes develops due to a combination of genetics, lack of exercise, and most significantly, poor dietary choices. As we get older, the risk for developing Type 2 diabetes increases due to the compounded effects of chronically elevated blood sugar levels, which put excessive strain on the pancreas.

Type-1 diabetes is primarily diagnosed in children. Their pancreas doesn’t produce insulin. It isn’t the result of lifestyle and environmental factors; therefore, it can only be treated by delivering insulin through injection. Only 5% of the U.S. cases of diabetes are Type-1 and there are no known alternative treatments.

 Escalating Rates of Diabetes in the U.S.

Some of the complications of hyperglycemia and diabetes include obesity, cataracts, glaucoma, blindness, nerve damage, periodontitis. Other conditions and complications related to cardiovascular disease include: high cholesterol, high triglycerides, and hypertension. The combination of hyperglycemia, cardiovascular disorders, and obesity constitutes metabolic syndrome, causing an escalated risk of heart attack. It is estimated that over 30% of the U.S. population has metabolic syndrome.

Type-2 diabetes is most prevalent and most within our control to reverse, with a little determination and commitment. The rate of diabetes in the U.S. would significantly decline if we focused on better dietary choices and using supplements that are proven to control blood glucose, rather than depending on drugs to regulate insulin and blood sugar.

Recently, a study was presented at the Endocrine Society Annual Meeting about the effects of adding healthy protein to the diet to help stabilize blood sugar and encourage weight loss. Researchers contended that the key to healthy weight loss and blood-sugar stabilization is a diet plan that includes a high calorie, high-protein breakfast, a medium-sized lunch, and a smaller dinner, which is practically the exact opposite of how many Americans eat.

The focus of the study was to determine if the quality of protein was significant. Study participants had type-2 diabetes and were overweight or obese. They were divided into three groups: group one ate primarily whey protein shakes for breakfast, group two had other protein sources, such as eggs, tuna, or soy for breakfast, and group three had a high-carb breakfast. After 12 weeks, group one lost almost 17 pounds, group two lost over 13 pounds and the high carb breakfast group lost almost 7 pounds. Group one also showed the most improvement in HbA1C blood levels, which is an indicator that blood-sugar levels were more stable over the long run as compared to the other two groups.

Beyond adding whey protein to your meals, these supplements have been found to help support stable blood sugar levels:

Berberine: A large body of research shows that berberine helps improve insulin resistance and stabilizes blood sugar levels, sometimes as well as metformin, a diabetic medication.

 Chromium: Improves sensitivity to insulin, helps lower blood sugar. Recommendation: up to 1,000 mcg/day.

 Alpha Lipoic Acid: A strong antioxidant. Improves insulin sensitivity and prevents or slows kidney damage; also improves symptoms of diabetic neuropathy (nerve pain). Recommendation: 600-1,200 mg/day.

 Magnesium: May improve insulin production in the elderly. Also shown to prevent diabetic retinopathy—a major cause of blindness. Recommendation: 200-600 mg/day

 Vitamin E: Those with low levels of vitamin E are more likely to develop diabetes. Shown to improve insulin resistance and decrease damage to nerves, eyes, and kidneys; also reduces chances of stroke. Recommendation: 800 IU/day.

B-vitamins: Shown to reduce blood sugar. B12 may significantly reduce nerve pain and improve nerve functioning when given orally at 500 mcg three times daily. Biotin, another B vitamin, has profound benefits for many with diabetes when given at 16 mg/day for a few weeks; some people’s fasting blood sugar reduced by as much as 50 percent.

The key is to prevent the progression of diabetes as early as possible. With proper diet, exercise, and supplements, you can improve blood-sugar stability and prevent the damaging effects of insulin resistance.

References:

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2016-04-large-whey-proteinbreakfast-diabetes.html JAMA May 19, 2015, Vol 313, No. 19 http://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/statistics/age/fig1.htm

July 1, 2016 at 2:03 pm Leave a comment

Navigating through the Maze of Curcumin Options

By Jennifer Morganti, ND, NEEDS Director of Education

Curcumin, derived from the Indian spice turmeric, is undoubtedly on my top-five favorites list, because it covers the majority of health issues that most people are concerned about. It is so versatile, it could single-handedly replace several different supplements in your pill box. This herb has a low absorption rate, so manufacturers have created options that use different technology to improve effectiveness. Better absorption equates to lower doses.

It’s exciting to see all the new curcumin supplements on the market, but how do you know which one to use? Unfortunately, you can not simply use the culinary spice from the grocery store because the quality isn’t guaranteed. You could buy the fresh root (organic) and grind it up daily, but that takes some serious dedication; therefore, taking curcumin in supplement form is the easiest and most effective way to benefit from this superstar herb.

There are a lot of options when looking for a quality curcumin product. To help simplify the process, we broke down all the variations and gave a simple summary for each so that you can choose a product that fits your needs.

Standardized Extract
Standardization is a common way to extract herbs and make sure they meet minimum potency of certain natural chemicals. A standardized turmeric extract should offer 95% total curcuminoids. This indicates a quality herbal extract, but unfortunately it doesn’t guarantee 100% absorption due to the nature of this ingredient.

C3
C3 offers 95% total cucuminoids and the extraction process ensures the presence of all three naturally-occurring curcuminoids: curcumin, demethoxy curcumin, and bisdemethoxy curcumin. There are no excipients or additives to the C3 extract. Over 70 research papers have been published on this particular ingredient.

Bioperine-Enhanced
Bioperine, known as piperine, a black pepper extract, has been shown to enhance curcumin absorption (as well as other nutrients). It may help with emulsification and nutrient transport.

Meriva
Meriva uses non-GMO soy lecithin-derived Phosphatidylcholine to embed the curcumin molecule. This makes it more acceptable to phospholipid membranes (found on most cells), and therefore better absorbed into cell membranes.

Longvida
Longvida uses a similar concept to Meriva, creating a “Solid Lipid Curcumin Particle” in an optimized lipophilic matrix for better absorption through the cell membrane.

BCM-95
This ingredient extracts all three of the important curcuminoids plus naturally-occurring essential oils through steam distillation and ethanol, making it extremely safe. It is 100% turmeric with no additives or fillers.

Theracurmin
This technology makes curcumin more water-soluble (and therefore more absorbable) by combining the powder with a vegetable gum-derived from the ghatti tree. This significantly improves the percentage of curcumin that gets absorbed through the intestines and into the blood.

MicroActive Curcumin – SR
This is a sustained release formulation that allows for slower, but more consistent absorption. The technology makes microparticles so it is water soluble and better absorbed through the use of carriers that assist in passing through the intestinal wall.

Choosing a curcumin product may not be a simple task, but with the assistance of a NEEDS wellness educator, you’ll be able to choose one that’s right for you!

September 9, 2014 at 10:00 am Leave a comment

The High Fructose Corn Syrup Insulin Trap

Carol B. Blair, BS, DiHom, CNC

CerealWe’ve all heard the ads about high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) with the catch phrase “Sugar is sugar.” Not true! Because high-fructose corn syrup is derived from corn (genetically modified, at that), the corn industry tried to call it “corn sugar,” but the FDA denied their claim. As you know, I am not a fan of the FDA, but it appears they finally got something right!

High-fructose corn syrup is highly processed and that processing comes with a price.

First and foremost, according to research published in Environmental Health, most of it is contaminated with mercury, which is used in the processing. Mercury is a poison linked to brain disorders including tremors, Parkinson’s, memory loss, and even Alzheimer’s. Remember the “mad hatters?” That term was coined because mercury was used in the hat-making process, and the makers went “mad.”

Due to the fact that high-fructose corn syrup metabolizes to fat very quickly in the body, and because of its rapid absorption into the blood stream, it causes insulin spikes. Weight gain is the result because insulin is a fat-storing hormone. Also, Dr. Mark Hyman states that HFCS “goes right to the liver and triggers lipogenesis (the production of fats like triglycerides and cholesterol); this is why it is the major cause of liver damage in this country and causes a condition called ‘fatty liver,’ which affects 70 million people.” Other metabolic disturbances such as increased appetite, accelerated aging, and diabetes also occur.

So what are some of the major products that contain high-fructose corn syrup? Unless you are a label reader (I am!), you’ll probably be surprised. Here are some of the common ones: cereal, salad dressing, pudding mixes, many yogurts (you just think you’re eating something healthy with many brands), candy, chocolate bars, ketchup, juices, bread, and pizza sauce. However, soft drinks are the biggest culprit of all. Many people have a very bad habit of drinking soft drinks instead of water. Don’t make the mistake of drinking low calorie, artificially sweetened, soft drinks as a replacement. I haven’t decided yet which one is worse–the high-fructose corn syrup or the artificial sweeteners!

As I stated in my last blog about artificial sweeteners, Xylitol and stevia are excellent, natural alternatives to artificial sweeteners.

We all know sugar isn’t good for us but the catch phrase, “Sugar is sugar,” is not true. High-fructose corn syrup is used because it is cheap–plain and simple. Don’t sacrifice your health for it.

September 2, 2014 at 2:00 pm Leave a comment

NEEDS Offers FREE Wellness Counseling!

Did you know that NEEDS’ professional wellness educators offer complimentary wellness consultations over the phone and can answer any questions that you have over email? Take advantage of this phenomenal service by calling 800-634-1380 or emailing info@needs.com.

Our Clinical Nutritionist Christine Carlson and our Naturopathic Doctor Jennifer Morganti are here to help you! Get to know our wellness educators:

Jennifer Morganti, ND
Director of Education

Morganti-JenniferDr. Jen received her Naturopathic degree from Bastyr University, one of the four accredited naturopathic schools in the US. She has been working in the Dietary Supplement and Natural Health industry for over 15 years. Dr. Jen’s passion is to make natural health information accessible to anyone who is interested in optimizing their health and to promote positive, healthy aging. Throughout her career, she has brought new dietary supplement products to market, provided advice on FDA regulations, and educated consumers nationwide through writing and speaking engagements.

Christine Carlson, BS, CN
Wellness Educator

Carlson-ChristineChristine Carlson, BS, CN, is a New York State Certified Nutritionist and a biofeedback practitioner with over 20 years’ experience in holistic health. She helps individuals optimize their health through nutrition and lifestyle changes. She focuses on a variety of health issues including digestive problems, allergies and sensitivities, immune dysfunction, osteoporosis, weight problems, stress management, depression, and more.

August 26, 2014 at 2:00 pm Leave a comment

Artificial Sweeteners Not so Sweet

By Carol B. Blair, BS, DiHom, CNC

SodaArtificial sweeteners are the rage because people think they can use all they want without gaining weight. However, studies show that these artificial sweeteners actually increase the appetite as well as the risk of metabolic syndrome and obesity. In addition to that, they come with a number of side effects. Let’s briefly discuss two of the most common artificial sweeteners: Splenda and Aspartame.

Splenda (aka Sucralose) is the newer of the synthetic chemicals which is made from sugar and covalently-bound chloride. A 2009 study showed it is absorbed by fat because our body has no way of breaking down the covalent bond; therefore, the body attempts to store it in the least harmful place–-fat cells. It also reduced good intestinal bacteria by 50%! Since good gut bacteria are strongly linked to the immune system, you are setting yourself up for health issues by consuming Splenda. Among its other many side effects were decreased red blood cells, migraine headaches, heart palpitations, wheezing, and reduced sperm production. At higher doses, it caused brain lesions and spontaneous abortions in rabbits.

One of the most dangerous products on the market is the sugar with Splenda that is being fed to kids!

Aspartame (aka NutraSweet and recently renamed AminoSweet), has been around longer but it isn’t any safer. In fact, it was once listed by the Pentagon as an agent for chemical warfare! The FDA receives more complaints about aspartame than all other additives combined.

Due to the fact that aspartame creates excitotoxicity (nerves fire excessively), most of the complaints are neurological–migraine headaches, mood disorders, and even hallucinations. Brain lesions have also been found in animals fed aspartame. In fact, I had a customer a few years ago who had been diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (with brain lesions) but when she got off the diet soda that contained aspartame, all of her symptoms went away. She was actually suffering from aspartame poisoning!

So if you want to keep your weight down and your health up, do yourself a favor and avoid the artificial sweeteners.  Instead, look for those sweetened with Xylitol and/or stevia. You could also buy unsweetened flavored sparkling water and just add the amount you need.

August 19, 2014 at 2:00 pm Leave a comment

Maintaining Hydration

By Laurel Sterling, RD

115525692In the summer, we tend to be outside more with physical activities, mowing lawns, gardening, parties, going for walks, and just plain having fun! We must remember not to ignore or dismiss our thirst mechanism. Typically when people think they are hungry, they actually are more than likely thirsty. Many times headaches are the result of dehydration, and one can feel dizzy, shaky, and lethargic when they are dehydrated. Sweating, stress, illness, and medications are ways we can lose our precious electrolytes.

Our bodies are made up of about 70% mineral water. It is recommended to drink at least 8 glasses (64 oz) of water a day or half your body weight in ounces. Water increases your body’s efficiency by eliminating toxins, assists in weight loss, helps prevent muscle and joint pain, bloating and constipation, and it maintains healthy skin. Remember, for every one caffeinated product you drink, you will need to drink TWO 8 oz. glasses of water to offset it because caffeinated products are diuretics.

A simple way to maintain proper hydration would be to just drink more good ol’ water, but those who are very active outside in the heat may need additional support.

There are some great drinks like Vita Coco 100% Pure Coconut Water that contain electrolytes to assist in rebalancing the body. Also, one could use E-lyte which is an electrolyte concentrate. This product can be diluted in water or other broths. Use caution with this product with children, those with high blood pressure, and people that are on a sodium-restricted diet. Other options are ConcenTrace Trace Mineral Drops that would be added to water.

August 12, 2014 at 2:00 pm Leave a comment

Older Posts


Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,253 other followers

Visit Our Website!

Facebook


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,253 other followers